Wastewater funding set for upgrade projects in three provinces

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The Val-Jalbert Historical Village sanitary sewer system dates back to 1975. New funding will pay to connect it with nearby Roberval's system. Interest in Val-Jalbert is due to its billing as a ghost town, or former “company town” of the 1920s, complete with about 40 original period buildings. Photo Credit: Sylvain Brousseau/Wikimedia Commons

A series of new funding announcements were issued last week for wastewater systems across Quebec, New Brunswick and Nova Scotia.

In New Brunswick, $1.3 million in funding was announced to upgrade the Université de Moncton’s water and wastewater infrastructure and expand the road infrastructure on campus, which serves about 4,200 students.

“This announcement is key for the Université de Moncton,” announced Jacques Paul Couturier, President and vice-chancellor of the Université de Moncton. “It opens the door to the realization of its Campus Research and Development project, an innovative and transformative project that will strengthen the development of research at the university. The Université de Moncton is pleased to contribute to regional and provincial economic vitality,” he added.

While details are scarce on the upgrades at the university, Andrew Harvey, Minister of the Environment and Local Government, stated that the new infrastructure will also serve areas near Moncton’s downtown core that “offer significant development potential.”

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About 215 kilometres west, in Stanley, New Brunswick, the federal government announced joint funding of more than $1 million to improve wastewater treatment. According to the funding announcement, the project involves an assessment of Stanley’s existing wastewater treatment plant and sanitary collection system. Work will also include the renewal of manholes, the replacement of the Southside wastewater pumping station, improvements to the Northside station, and the installation of new flow meters.

“Our current system was installed in 1979 and required some extensive repairs in order to service the residents of our community,” announced Barbara MacDonald, Deputy-Mayor of the Village of Stanley. “The repairs will help us to make necessary changes in order to comply with environment and local government regulations of the day,” she added.

The Government of Canada is contributing more than $521,000 to the project and the Government of New Brunswick is providing more than $260,000 through the Clean Water and Wastewater Fund, with The Village of Stanley providing the balance of the funding.

The province of Quebec, the government of Canada and the Regional County Municipality of Domaine-du-Roy are each investing close to $513,000 to upgrade Val-Jalbert Historical Village’s wastewater treatment system. In total, this represents a government-municipal investment of more than $1.5 million.

The Val-Jalbert Historical Village sanitary sewer system dates back to 1975. This new funding will pay to connect it with nearby Roberval’s system. This upgrade will help preserve the site, which is classified under the Quebec Cultural Heritage Act, and welcomes some 82,000 visitors each year.

Interest in Val-Jalbert is due to its billing as a ghost town, or former “company town” of the 1920s, complete with about 40 original period buildings.

According to the funding announcement, the upgrades will also help protect the environmentally sensitive area at the mouth of the Ouiatchouan River and Lac Saint-Jean, ensuring the sustainable and responsible development of the village.

Lastly, in Fall River, Nova Scotia, the Government of Canada is providing up to $2.2 million out of $4.5 million in total eligible project costs through the Clean Water and Wastewater Fund. The Government of Nova Scotia and the Halifax Regional Municipality will cover the remainder of funding for what’s being considered as a water servicing project.

The work will be comprised generally of the installation of 3.1 kilometres of water main along the Fall River Road, Highway 2, and a portion of Ingram Drive. These improvements will provide reliable water service to the community, while safeguarding the health and well-being of local residents and the surrounding environment, states the funding announcement.

“Together we will bring this mainline distribution project to fruition, and enable future expansion to neighbouring areas in the near future,” announced Steve Streatch, Councillor for Waverley–Fall River–Musquodoboit Valley within the Halifax Regional Municipality.

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