CIB commits $140M to Manitoba wastewater projects as province looks to expand housing

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wastewater treatment plant image
The Red-Seine-Rat cooperative project includes rehabilitation of a water treatment plant, construction of a wastewater treatment plant, and delivery and collection infrastructure. Photo Credit: Canada Infrastructure Bank

Following a $140-million investment in southeastern Manitoba wastewater infrastructure, the Canada Infrastructure Bank (CIB) is looking to partner on more new, large-scale infrastructure projects in Manitoba, including water facilities, to enable new housing construction through improved capacity. 

For its new Infrastructure for Housing Initiative (IHI), the CIB said it wants to continue to invest in projects that support population growth opportunities through water, wastewater and stormwater infrastructure. 

“Through our new lending initiative, we are committed to working with municipalities to unlock new housing developments,” announced CIB CEO Ehren Cory, in a statement. “The housing challenge in Canada requires innovative thinking, new partnerships and a variety of financing supports to make progress.” 

Recently, the CIB committed up to $140 million to the Red-Seine-Rat wastewater cooperative project, which includes the rural municipalities of Taché, Hanover, and Ritchot, as well as the Town of Niverville and the City of Brandon. The new water and wastewater infrastructure will support cleaner water for approximately 78,000 housing units located in southeastern Manitoba, and is expected to unlock development of up to 15,000 housing units in these growing communities.  

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The Red-Seine-Rat cooperative project includes rehabilitation of a water treatment plant, construction of a wastewater treatment plant, and delivery and collection infrastructure. The project also supports a regional wastewater system that can achieve economies of scale, efficiencies, and capacity for future upgrades, the CIB announced. 

The Red-Seine-Rat CIB project will also include installation of a wastewater conveyance system with approximately 90 kilometres of effluent pipeline, as well as new lift and pump stations.

In the City of Brandon, the water treatment facility upgrade and expansion project will enable Manitoba’s second-largest city to provide potable water that meets and exceeds the standards set by the Manitoba Office of Drinking Water.  

“This investment of $140 million will not only modernize our water treatment facilities and wastewater systems, but also pave the way for sustainable growth in our communities for generations to come,” announced Jeff Fawcett, Mayor of the City of Brandon, in a statement. 

The Southwest Brandon Wastewater Servicing project will help expand coverage of the existing wastewater processing facility to accommodate residential and commercial demand in this growing region of the city. 

While Winnipeg has made headlines for its wastewater infrastructure challenges in recent months, particularly after maintenance crews worked to create a functioning bypass for a burst pipe near the Fort Garry Bridge, the city has also been investing heavily in its infrastructure.  

Upgrades to Winnipeg’s North End Sewage Treatment Plant, however, still require funding to complete the plant’s biosolids facility, the second of three phases of the project that could double its original estimate and surpass $1 billion. 

A task force was formed to manage the progress of the plant’s upgrades.  

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